Destroying "Taiwan’s Credibility"

Destroying “Taiwan’s Credibility”
Bevin Chu
April 24, 2006

In tracking the winners and losers in the ongoing struggle between Pan Green Quislings and Pan Blue patriots, one really has to know how to read the scorecards.

For example, Pan Green critics of the Pan Green camp’s leadership have lately been lamenting the fact that Chen Shui-bian and the DPP, through their flagrant corruption and appalling incompetence, have destroyed “Taiwan’s credibility,” both at home and abroad.

By this of course they don’t mean “Taiwan’s credibility.” They mean the Taiwan independence nomenklatura’s credibility, and the appeal of Taiwan independence as a political “ideal,” among both the Chinese people on Taiwan and foreign observers.

Pan Blue talking heads will often chime in with Pan Green critics when they express their dismay over the fact that unprincipled and opportunistic Taiwan independence Quislings have, true to their unprincipled and opportunistic nature, sold the Taiwan independence movement down the river.

Every time I watch Pan Blue spokespersons do this on TV talkshows, I can’t help doing a double-take.

Do these purported defenders of the Republic of China really want a clean, competent Pan Green regime to do a good job of governing Taiwan, thereby enhancing the domestic and international appeal of Taiwan independence as a political goal?

These Pan Blue spokespersons remind me of Colonel Nichols, the captured British army engineering officer in “The Bridge on the River Kwai” (1957, directed by David Lean, novel by Pierre Boulle, screenplay by Michael Wilson, Carl Foreman), who having gotten caught up in doing a professional job of building a railway bridge for his Japanese captors, completely loses sight of his larger purpose, to defeat the enemy.

Sometimes, I have to admit, I feel a little bit like Commander Shears, frustrated at Colonel Nicholson’s failure to see the bigger picture.


The Bridge on the River Kwai


British Army Engineering Officer Colonel Nicholson (Alec Guiness)


US Navy Commander Shears (William Holden)

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